Issue One: Jan-Feb 2013

  • Is there a better way out of a debt crisis than Austerity? Joel Bell, Editor, Year 13 This question is at the forefront of British minds as we enter ‘the age of austerity’ with our coalition government. Currently UK debt stands at over £1.1 trillion, striking us all with a need for resolve. Throughout the ages people have argued what the best way to successfully run a country ...
  • Should we Privatise Healthcare in the UK? Joel Bell, Editor, Year 13 Despite the cuts the coalition government is trying to persist in making, the NHS continues to be an ever-growing money sponge. That is not to say it is a waste of money, rather that in times of budget shrinking, the Health sector is one of the only areas getting bigger considering ...
  • Can the government justify giving every child in Britain a box of Lego for free? Sam Laidler, Year 13 In my opinion, it is not a question of ‘could the government justify giving every child in Britain a box of Lego for free’ but ‘how soon can the government give away said boxes of Lego’? At first such a proposal appears laughable at best, but spare a minute to consider the possible ...
  • A word from the Editor: Footballer’s Wages I can’t stand the issue of footballers wages, and no I am not going to propose that same, unreasoned, unconsidered argument of “Footballers get paid way too much, they’re scum, the army should be given their wages”. This is, of course, because this argument is wrong. It’s not wrong in the fact that footballers don’t ...
  • Is Africa well placed to achieve rapid and sustainable development in the decade ahead? Sam Gravatt, Year 13 In eight of the past ten years, growth in sub-Saharan Africa has been faster than in Eastern Asia. Sub-Saharan growth, in 2010, was 4.8%, outperforming the world average by 0.6%. Its population is set to double over the next 40 years from around one billion to two billion. Furthermore, it will not ...
  • What role do Exchange Rates play in response to Macroeconomic Shock? Sam Boyle, Year 13 An economic shock at a macroeconomic level is going to affect the whole economy, and we can presume it will do so in a negative way, and this is usually going to be in terms of damaging a country’s GDP or limiting its potential capacity. One possible way to combat a macroeconomic ...
  • A word from the Editor: Greece If you ask me, Greece has little option but to default. As they embarrassingly try to continue democracy, in which the people vote for anything but the relevant austerity, leaving the Euro is becoming the only realistic option. Though this would create devastation in the Eurozone, looking at the impact on Greece alone, leaving the ...
  • High Profit Water Companies reduce Tax bill to a Trickle Kieran Singh and Ross Turner, Junior Article Companies such as Thames Water and Anglian Water have been found not paying any corporation tax, while having a combined profit of £1.1bn –whereas Yorkshire Water paid out £2.9m in corporation tax while generating profit of £303m; which is a clearly noticeable difference. In a meeting of the Public Accounts ...
  • “Tax Amazon, or it will kill us off”, says John Lewis By Daniel Robinson, Year 12 The managing director of John Lewis, Andy Street, has claimed that it could be put out of business if foreign multinational corporations such as Amazon continue to be taxed a very small amount, compared to British businesses, like John Lewis, having to pay a much higher sum. This difference gives Amazon ...
  • Accounting Merger seeks to take on ‘The Big Four’ Thomas Yeung and Tim Harvard, Junior Article  An article, published in The Independent on the 8th November, provides an insightful description of an expected merger between the two British accountancy/audit firms, BDO and PKF, the sixth and ninth largest of its sector respectively. The companies had revenues of £280 million and £103 million in the past ...
  • Twitter in IPO retreat after Facebook failure By Nick Bradley, Year 12 Twitter has been following in Facebook’s footsteps recently in the context that shares in the company are predicted to fall rapidly. Facebook became a public company earlier this year due to the failure to redeem its stock struggle. Many investors in Twitter are hoping that the IPO could help the company ...
  • Are Patents Actually Beneficial? Sam Boyle, Year 13 As most of you already know, a patent is a government grant to a creator of invention, which gives them to right to make, use and sell that invention for a set period of time, and takes away the right of other companies to make that exact product.  The idea of patents, ...
  • Is Inflation Always Harmful? Sam Gravatt, Year 13 Inflation is considered to be a sustained increase in the cost of living, or the general price level. It is important to recognise that there are two main causes of inflation: demand-pull and cost-push. The type of inflation experienced in the economy will be important to the extent to which it can ...